ASTMH 2017, Edward Wenger: "Relating genetic signatures to transmission conditions responsible for the emergence and spread of multi-drug-resistant parasites in Cambodia"

Nov 2017

In collaboration with ASTMH, Image Audiovisuals, and session presenters, MESA brings you this webcast from the 66th ASTMH annual meeting in Baltimore, November 2017

 

Title: "Relating genetic signatures to transmission conditions responsible for the emergence and spread of multi-drug-resistant parasites in Cambodia"

 

Speaker: Edward Wenger, Institute for Disease Modeling, USA

 

Session information: 

Symposium 0137: "Malaria: Genetics and Genomics"(link is external)

Wednesday, 8 November, 10:15 - 12:00 PM, Convention Center - Room 321/322/323 (Level 300)

 

Abstract:

Over the last decade, multiple independent emergences of artemisinin-resistant parasite strains have occurred in SE Asia. More recently the emergence and spread of parasites resistant to partner drugs in artemisinin combination therapies presents a challenge to the goal of elimination in the Greater Mekong Subregion. What are the characteristics of transmission networks in Cambodia that are responsible for the emergence and spread of ACT-resistant strains? Using a dynamical malaria model that tracks full parasite genomes, we have simulated a range of transmission topologies characteristic of malaria exposure in small forest-going populations. We relate the time series of genetic signatures observed in clinical samples — e.g. region of origin, drug-resistant markers, relatedness of parasite strains within and among infections — to infer the local intensity of transmission and connectivity between regions. We find that small effective populations, frequent founder effects, focal risk, long-range migration, and drug-usage patterns significantly affect the rate of selecting resistance in our simulations. Finally, we demonstrate the value of timely genetic surveillance to inform future treatment strategies in a world of widespread ACT failure.

Details

  • Country Author(s)
    • American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH)
    Collaborator(s)
    • Institute for Disease Modeling, USA
    Resource type